Army Standby Reserve, Early Out Loophole

Many Troop Program Unit (TPU) Soldiers are unfamiliar with the Standby Reserve. Soldiers with a dependency hardship, employment conflict, or other issue prohibiting effective participation in the TPU, may request a transfer to the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR).

The Standby Reserve is also available. Where the IRR offers a deconflicting solution for long-term drilling incompatibilities; the Standby Reserve offers a deconflicting solution for short-term drilling incompatibilities.

For example, if a soldier has a dependency hardship that is permanent, or prolonged, he has the option to transfer to the IRR for dependency or hardship. However, if this dependency hardship is short-term, the soldier can transfer to the Standby Reserve until the issue is resolved.

Soldiers in the Standby Reserve maintain their military affiliation. It’s one of the three main Army Reserve components. The other two being the Ready Reserve (TPU/IMA/IRR) and the Retired Reserve. The Standby Reserve has two categories. They’re the Active Status List and the Inactive Status List.

Chapter 8, AR 140-10, Army Reserve Assignments, Attachments, and Details, covers the Standby Reserve.

Active Status List:

Soldiers on this list are able to earn retirement points. They can drill for points only, and they are eligible for promotion. The highest promotion that can be achieved in this component is Colonel (O-6). Soldiers on this list include key employees, temporary hardship, temporary medical, theological students, overseas residency, missionary, HIV positive, and secretarial determination.

Key Employees:

Soldiers in this group are crucial to their employment and organization. The Soldier’s absence negatively impacts the employer’s operations. Usually, the time lag between losing the Soldier for mobilization, and getting a replacement for the Soldier’s position, is enough to harm the employer’s long-term mission. The Soldier generally possess skills unique to the employer’s operation; finding a replacement isn’t easy.

Details for what constitutes “key employee” are listed in 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 44, Guidance. Also included in this Code of Federal Regulations is a letter format that the employer could use to request that a certain Soldier, occupying a key employee position, be removed from the Ready Reserve.

Temporary Hardship:

Soldiers with short-term hardships that are resolvable within a year or two. These Soldiers desire returning to the Ready Reserve when the temporary hardship is resolved.

Temporary Medical Disqualification:

These are Soldiers who have a medical condition, or profile, that prohibits full engagement in the Ready Reserve. This medical condition is temporary in nature; the Soldier expects to recover in a short period of time. Time period ranges from one through two years. Soldiers may transfer to the Standby Reserve until this medical issue is resolved. Once the medical disqualification is resolved, and the soldier is medically qualified to participate in the TPU, he or she has the option to return to the Ready Reserve.

Theological Students:

Soldiers engaged in ministry studies with an accredited school that provides theological or divinity training. These Soldiers may remain in the active list for the duration of their studies.

This option isn’t available for Soldiers involved with the military versions of this training.

Overseas Residency or Missionary Obligation:

Troop Program Unit Soldiers with a legitimate nonmilitary requirement to participate in an overseas residency, or on a missionary mission, may transfer to the Standby Reserve. The maximum time allowed, for this category, is 30 months. This has to be a temporary residency or temporary missionary obligation.

HIV positive:

If a Soldier tests positive for HIV, this Soldier may transfer to the Standby Reserve.

Secretarial Determination:

The Secretary of the Army may decide that a Soldier’s transfer to this component is in the best interest of the Army. Soldiers may remain on this list for up to 2 years.

After these 2 years, the Soldier must transfer to the IRR, request transfer to the Retired Reserve if eligible, or request discharge. If a Soldier still has to complete his Military Service Obligation, this Soldier will be transferred to the IRR.

Standby Reserve-Inactive Status List:

Unlike the Soldiers on the Active Status List, Soldiers in the Inactive Status List aren’t able to earn retirement points. Consequently, they’re not able to train for points or pay, and they’re not eligible for promotion.

Two categories of Soldiers transfer to the Inactive Status List: Key employees and general officers.

Soldiers may be removed from the Ready Reserve and placed into the Standby Reserve. If these Soldiers don’t request to be assigned to the Active Status List, they’re assigned to the Inactive Status List.

General officers, not occupying positions associated with their rank, may request transfer to the Inactive Status List.

Standby Reserve list screening:

Soldiers on the Active and Inactive Status lists are subject to regular screening. The screenings involve a review of the Soldier’s qualifications for remaining in this component. Soldiers can either be removed or they can be given the option to remain if qualified.

Soldiers that meet the removal requirements listed in AR 140-10, section I of chapter 7, will be removed.

If a Soldier still needs to complete his or her military service obligation, and if he or she qualifies for transfer to the IRR, that Soldier will be transferred to the IRR.

A Soldier that no longer has a military obligation has one of three options:

* The Soldier may choose to transfer to the IRR.

* If eligible, the Soldier may choose to transfer to the Retired Reserve.

* The Soldier may also choose to be discharged from the Army Reserve.

If a Soldier qualifies for reenlistment, and he or she is in the reenlistment window, he or she may reenlist to remain in the Standby Reserve, or reenlist with concurrent reassignment to the TPU, IMA, or IRR.

Tips:

Refer to the references below for guidance on qualifications for, and on initiating, a transfer to the Standby Reserve.

References:

32 CFR Appendix A to Part 44, Guidance, Key Employee

AR 140-10, Army Reserve Assignments, Attachments, Details, and Transfers.

AR 140-111, U.S. Army Reserve Reenlistment Program

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Many Troop Program Unit (TPU) Soldiers are unfamiliar with the Standby Reserve. Soldiers with a dependency hardship, employment conflict, or other issue prohibiting effective participation in the TPU, may request a transfer to the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR).

The Standby Reserve is also available. Where the IRR offers a deconflicting solution for long-term drilling incompatibilities; the Standby Reserve offers a deconflicting solution for short-term drilling incompatibilities.

For example, if a soldier has a dependency hardship that is permanent, or prolonged, he has the option to transfer to the IRR for dependency or hardship. However, if this dependency hardship is short-term, the soldier can transfer to the Standby Reserve until the issue is resolved.

Soldiers in the Standby Reserve maintain their military affiliation. It’s one of the three main Army Reserve components. The other two being the Ready Reserve (TPU/IMA/IRR) and the Retired Reserve. The Standby Reserve has two categories. They’re the Active Status List and the Inactive Status List.

Chapter 8, AR 140-10, Army Reserve Assignments, Attachments, and Details, covers the Standby Reserve.

Active Status List:

Soldiers on this list are able to earn retirement points. They can drill for points only, and they are eligible for promotion. The highest promotion that can be achieved in this component is Colonel (O-6). Soldiers on this list include key employees, temporary hardship, temporary medical, theological students, overseas residency, missionary, HIV positive, and secretarial determination.

Key Employees:

Soldiers in this group are crucial to their employment and organization. The Soldier’s absence negatively impacts the employer’s operations. Usually, the time lag between losing the Soldier for mobilization, and getting a replacement for the Soldier’s position, is enough to harm the employer’s long-term mission. The Soldier generally possess skills unique to the employer’s operation; finding a replacement isn’t easy.

Details for what constitutes “key employee” are listed in 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 44, Guidance. Also included in this Code of Federal Regulations is a letter format that the employer could use to request that a certain Soldier, occupying a key employee position, be removed from the Ready Reserve.

Temporary Hardship:

Soldiers with short-term hardships that are resolvable within a year or two. These Soldiers desire returning to the Ready Reserve when the temporary hardship is resolved.

Temporary Medical Disqualification:

These are Soldiers who have a medical condition, or profile, that prohibits full engagement in the Ready Reserve. This medical condition is temporary in nature; the Soldier expects to recover in a short period of time. Time period ranges from one through two years. Soldiers may transfer to the Standby Reserve until this medical issue is resolved. Once the medical disqualification is resolved, and the soldier is medically qualified to participate in the TPU, he or she has the option to return to the Ready Reserve.

Theological Students:

Soldiers engaged in ministry studies with an accredited school that provides theological or divinity training. These Soldiers may remain in the active list for the duration of their studies.

This option isn’t available for Soldiers involved with the military versions of this training.

Overseas Residency or Missionary Obligation:

Troop Program Unit Soldiers with a legitimate nonmilitary requirement to participate in an overseas residency, or on a missionary mission, may transfer to the Standby Reserve. The maximum time allowed, for this category, is 30 months. This has to be a temporary residency or temporary missionary obligation.

HIV positive:

If a Soldier tests positive for HIV, this Soldier may transfer to the Standby Reserve.

Secretarial Determination:

The Secretary of the Army may decide that a Soldier’s transfer to this component is in the best interest of the Army. Soldiers may remain on this list for up to 2 years.

After these 2 years, the Soldier must transfer to the IRR, request transfer to the Retired Reserve if eligible, or request discharge. If a Soldier still has to complete his Military Service Obligation, this Soldier will be transferred to the IRR.

Standby Reserve-Inactive Status List:

Unlike the Soldiers on the Active Status List, Soldiers in the Inactive Status List aren’t able to earn retirement points. Consequently, they’re not able to train for points or pay, and they’re not eligible for promotion.

Two categories of Soldiers transfer to the Inactive Status List: Key employees and general officers.

Soldiers may be removed from the Ready Reserve and placed into the Standby Reserve. If these Soldiers don’t request to be assigned to the Active Status List, they’re assigned to the Inactive Status List.

General officers, not occupying positions associated with their rank, may request transfer to the Inactive Status List.

Standby Reserve list screening:

Soldiers on the Active and Inactive Status lists are subject to regular screening. The screenings involve a review of the Soldier’s qualifications for remaining in this component. Soldiers can either be removed or they can be given the option to remain if qualified.

Soldiers that meet the removal requirements listed in AR 140-10, section I of chapter 7, will be removed.

If a Soldier still needs to complete his or her military service obligation, and if he or she qualifies for transfer to the IRR, that Soldier will be transferred to the IRR.

A Soldier that no longer has a military obligation has one of three options:

* The Soldier may choose to transfer to the IRR.

* If eligible, the Soldier may choose to transfer to the Retired Reserve.

* The Soldier may also choose to be discharged from the Army Reserve.

If a Soldier qualifies for reenlistment, and he or she is in the reenlistment window, he or she may reenlist to remain in the Standby Reserve, or reenlist with concurrent reassignment to the TPU, IMA, or IRR.

Tips:

Refer to the references below for guidance on qualifications for, and on initiating, a transfer to the Standby Reserve.

References:

32 CFR Appendix A to Part 44, Guidance, Key Employee

AR 140-10, Army Reserve Assignments, Attachments, Details, and Transfers.

AR 140-111, U.S. Army Reserve Reenlistment Program

, Army Standby Reserve, Early Out Loophole , Travis Hill , http://ezinearticles.com/expert/Travis_Hill/179751 , , , https://ezinearticles.com/?Army-Standby-Reserve,-Early-Out-Loophole&id=9858823

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